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Coast Guard locates debris where private plane carrying four people went missing over the Bermuda Triangle

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The US Coast Guard has located a debris field near the Bahamas, where a private plane carrying four people - including two children and a CEO from New York - went missing in the Bermuda Triangle. Pilot Nathan Ulrich, 52, of New Hampshire, and Jennifer Blumin, 40, of New York, who is the Founder and CEO of event management firm, Skylight Group, were identified as two of the people onboard. (www.dailymail.co.uk) Mais...

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jkatten
Jeff Katten 1
https://flightaware.com/live/flight/N220N/history/20170515/1400Z/TJBQ/KTIX
yr2012
matt jensen 1
helo crew locates debris field approx. 15 mi E of Eleuthera, Bahamas. Search for survivors continues, more to follow.
bbabis
Bill Babis 1
This looks like a tragic accident. Probably a mechanical/maintenance issue such as a thrown prop blade that became catastrophic and prevented a radio call. Unless sure evidence is found, let's not be too fast to fault the aircraft or pilot on this one. May God give comfort and peace to the families involved.
fldewey
mike moore 1
Reading about this it's an interesting story behind the design. Sounds like if everything is working fine it's a solid ride, but if things go wrong they can go wrong in a hurry.

bentwing60
bentwing60 1
If you are buying an airplane with a SFAR attached to its A.C. like this one https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title14-vol2/pdf/CFR-2012-title14-vol2-part91-appFederal-id438.pdf, you best read the fine print. Some years back an MU2 was considered by some a good transition airplane to a 20 series Lear. I tend to think it worked the other way around, cause a 20 series Lear required 2 pilots and sometimes the other one kept you alive.
bbabis
Bill Babis 1
If you remember, the 20 series had many accidents and a common moniker was "high altitude lawn dart" in its early history. Requiring training and that training improving solved the problem. It turned out to be a great aircraft. This SFAR simply brings the MU-2 into the jet class where it should have been all along. The MU-2 is a great aircraft when operated correctly and anyone wishing to fly one should have no qualms about taking the training.
bentwing60
bentwing60 1
I agree with all, I'm typed in the Lear and lived in it for a few "wonderful" part 135 years in the 80's. I've known an MU2 driver or 2 and they either loved it or hated it, but nobody has ever told me that either is a forgiving airplane. This is like the 3rd Mitsubishi with fresh ink on the registration cert. lost in CAVU in a couple of years. I'm not averse to folks moving up in airplane performance but the NTSB reports do get old.
bbabis
Bill Babis 1
This accident is far different from the others. From all is good and FL240 to in the ocean one minute later the circumstances do not point to pilot qualifications or operational issues. This pilot had happen what we all fear most, a rapid onset and catastrophic failure beyond his control.
bentwing60
bentwing60 1
I'm guessin you are 100% correct there. Hadn't parsed the 240 to gone in one minute part and no radio at all.
zcolescott
Zachary Colescott -1
Bermuda Triangle?
bentwing60
bentwing60 2
Geographically, yes, the cause, No. Who knows? Really amazing how many of these folks can buy a 300+ knt. airplane and shortly thereafter kill all aboard on a CAVU day. She bought it 4 months ago. An MU2 ain't a user friendly airplane! But it was cheap. Just sayin.
zcolescott
No it most certainly is not. I have time in the right seat of a couple MU-2 aircraft, and it is by far my least favorite aircraft to be in. It can be a great airplane (according to many who own them), but it is extremely unforgiving.
bbabis
Bill Babis 1
I never had a moments issue with the airplane. It was one of the best I ever flew. I took my training with Reece Howell in Smyrna, TN, the best MU-2 guru in the world, and felt confident from day one. If you flew it correctly, it was very forgiving and easy to fly. If not, that is where the bad stories came from.

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