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1958 Cessna 182 Makes Emergency Landing on Pennsylvania Highway

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C182 based at Smoketown (S37) in Lancaster, PA. Track earlier flight to Portsmouth (PSM) on Monday. Was enroute to S37 from PSM when pilot reported "engine failure" at 4,000-feet. Made emergency landing on US422 WB in Exeter, Berks Cty, PA at approx. 2145 local (0245Z). Pilot managed to weave around traffic and land safely, only striking one car. (www.wgal.com) Mais...

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Rpalmqui
Rpalmqui 10
I came upon him about 1 minute after he landed. Luck was with him because a semi barely missed clipping his right wing. Tracks show non-stop to PSM from Brandywine (OQN) earlier that day. He reported to police that he was on a day trip with friends to gain some hours. Three occupants (incl. pilot), all safe, no injuries. Looks like some minor damage to left wing tip on the leading edge. Aircraft registered to company that runs skydiving business at S37 (which explains the absence of wheel pants and a step on the right main. NOT JUDGING ALERT: I suspect that on the return flight, the prevailing westerly winds may have impacted his fuel consumption; however, that's ultimately for the NTSB to decide.

R123154
RICK HUGHES 3
Believe it or not I have known of new pilots who were applying for their 1st job in the Commercial field having a emergency landing actually helping them get their job.
In my 25+ years in aviation i've heard a lot to . The thing i heard the most from a group of check pilots i knew in a major airline of that time
R123154
RICK HUGHES 3
The previous post was sent by accident before i could finish it.1 reason i don't like to reply on a phone .

What i was saying though was that when this subject came up most said it helped show that a young pilot with less experience handled the situation and put the aircraft on the ground .Then everyone i had talked to laughed and said besides that it would likely not happen twice to any pilot . But Rpalmqui has the most likely reason. The 182 i've flown quite a few times and it was my 1st High Performance aircraft i fleq.Going from the. 152 to the 182 ? That bird scared the heck out of me and is a beast when on the 1st flight . Glad i was still using my 1st instructor ..
Happy to see a good outcome here too.
Rpalmqui
Rpalmqui 3
That's a good point, Rick. Regardless of whether he made a fuel calc error, he did an incredible job of getting that bird down safely. It's even more impressive that he did it in traffic and at night. And he picked a stretch of road with no wires overhead (1/2-mile further and he wouldn't have been so lucky). And that highway has lots of traffic most hours of the day or night. The local press is calling him "Exeter Sully" and a hero. I don't know that I'd call him a hero, I'd call him a calm, clear-thinking, and competent pilot in an emergency. I'll take that over a "hero" any day in a plane. The 182P (1972) that I flew had a range of about 500nm. This was a 182B so, if it was me, on the return from PSM I would have planned a fuel stop in the Nyack, NY or Pocono area on the return because of the prevailing winds. Again, regardless, he's shown good crisis skills.
sparkie624
sparkie624 2
One large keep to making an emergency landing is to stay Calm and Cool... Having to do an Emergency Landing at night, the cars may have actually helped him see the road in the first place... I doubt from 4000 feet with no traffic he would have been able to see the road to even attempt a decent approach... He did a good job landing the plane. The news article isn't much, but any incident you walk away from with minimal plane damage is good...

I noticed the Pilots side door is off... that part is courious!
Rpalmqui
Rpalmqui 1
I know the passenger side door was a "flip-up" door because the plane was configured for sky diving. Might have had a similar door on the pilot's side with a quick-release. Don't know for sure.
sparkie624
sparkie624 2
In the picture, it showed the pilots side door laying flat on the ground is the reason that I noticed it.
patpylot
patrick baker 2
this pilot know can tell anyone about how much more focus and concentration he had, more than he suspected he ever had. He had some good flight instruction, and was pleased to note that with little or no power, the cessna 182 needs very little solid surface to come to a complete stop.
Rpalmqui
Rpalmqui 1
Yes, his instructor should be proud. The 182 I flew had a Horton STOL kit and we could get in to some really small fields with that kit.

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