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Delta To Improve Passenger Comfort On 225 Domestic Narrowbody Aircraft

Enviado há
 
Delta Air Lines will invest more than $770 million through 2016 to refresh the interiors on its Boeing 757-200, 737-800, Airbus A319 and A320 aircraft to provide power at every seat, add new slim-line seats with adjustable headrests, updated lavatories, add more efficient galleys and additional features to improve passenger comfort. (news.delta.com) Mais...

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Moviela
Ric Wernicke 6
So they are increasing seat width by a whopping three-quarter inch, and are placing it on a 31 inch pitch? This must be the dream of a sharp pencil boy who measured the cabin, but failed to measure the passengers.
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The airlines will continually increase their offer of economy plus product. That way the passengers who want the extra inches can choose that and pay for it. Everyone else happy with smush class can live with the limited personal space and cheaper fares.

On the flip side, the seat back IFE is that much closer.

And also, the limited space to open a laptop is just the excuse for not being able to work all the way through the flight. Companies who expect work inflight will have to pay for the extra space.

An of you find yourself on a Asiana plane, you'll be better able to brace yourself against that closer seat back.
mldavis2
Mike Davis 4
The United 757's are the worst of a bad bunch for passenger space. I am 6'4" tall which is not abnormal by any means, yet cannot fit into a seat if the passenger in front of me tries to recline the seat back. My knees contact the seat frame in front. I've found this to be a problem as well in some Asian airlines where the average passenger is perhaps 5'6" tall and seating is adjusted accordingly.

I don't mind paying a few extra dollars for more knee room, but seldom are those choice seats available for purchase, having been snatched up by early ticket buyers. The cost difference to move up to business or first class (if available) is outrageous. If I am to be charged for my physical "abnormalities" in terms of height, then airlines should be charging passengers also for physical attributes such as weight and luggage.
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PhotoFinish 1
That's lost revenue. Which is why you're seeing airlines increasing economy plus type product.

There are airlines such as JetBlue and VirginAmerica that offer more legroom as standard at every seat. Use them preferentially to get the best experience for yourself. Doing so also sends a powerful market signal. When everyone in the same situation that needs/wants more legroom chooses their airline accordingly, you'll get mire of what you want/need.

On the flip, what doesn't make sense is for individuals to choose the cheapest possible fare (because it is cheapest without regard for legroom) and then complain about the allocated space.
mldavis2
Mike Davis 1
That's nice theory, but it doesn't work for me. I live in driving distance of several airports (KXNA, KTUL, KSGF, KJLN and a looong drive to KMCI). None of these airports are serviced by JetBlue or VirginAmerica. I would gladly spend $25-50 for adequate legroom on long flights cross country or international, but there are very few such seats available and they always seem to have been taken when I purchase my tickets. There just aren't enough of them. Why don't airlines quit playing games and raise ticket prices on all steerage seats to cover 2" of extra legroom?
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Because most steerage class passengers most important purchasing criteria is fare price.

That the extra legroom seats are consistently selling out in advance is likely part of the rationale for the increases in extra legroom seats (both in economy plus sections*) as well as the growth of JetBlue and VirginAmerica.

Keep buying them, and they'll keep increasing their offer.

* there's also been a dramatic increase in premium cabin seating (business and first class) which also provide plenty of legroom. But I limit my comments to economy and economy plus cabins, because not everyone wants the full premium product only to insure adequate legroom.

There is however a legitimacy to offering seats of varying personal space and charging accordingly. Even JetBlue that offers more legroom at all seats as standard is now building premium sections at the front of their planes.

As long as more people drive long distances to pay spirit's low prices, rather than drive long distances for JetBlue greater legroom, the market will increasing price for and offer the spirit product. As JetBlue fills in between the coasts in midAmerica, make an effort to support their flights as they test new markets, if you want airlines that either a) offer more legroom as standard at every seat like JetBlue or VirginAmerica, and or b) offer more legroom in economy plus sections in response to these up and coming airlines.

For those who don't flying the upstarts because of their mileage loyalty programs with a major airline, and complain about legroom. 'What are you thinking?!?..'
n7224e
BC Hadley 1
I am 5'3" and feel cramped on US carriers.
HGreen
Herb Green 1
What about the 10 737-700's? Plans for them?
mschacht44
Mike Schacht 1
Probably just sell them to Southwest.
pilot62
Scott Campbell 1
Plan to aovid them ...
mldavis2
Mike Davis 1
One problem I see with the demand theory is that airlines have no way to monitor demand. I would always pay a bit more (not first class more) for a mere 2" of knee room. But since those seats are seldom if ever available and I sit in steerage, they never know my demand is there. It's like walking through a check-out counter when the cashier asks if I found everything. I say "no, you were out of swiss cheese" and that message is never passed along to the buyers.
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If te economy plus is always sold out long before the travel date, that's all te feedback that the airlines need to know that two are missing out on premium seating sales opportunities.

In fact, each time a plane refurbishing is announced, it seems that the available premium seating, including in economy is ever increasing - always seemingly increase over the number being replaced. The only number that seems to go down is regular economy. As frequencies increase and planes get smaller, it seems that economy is the most reduced, while premium seating increases in a rwlautube or absolute sense.

So while the lowest product continues to get lower, the options to pick an upgraded seating option increases.

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