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Amelia Earhart New Clues Revealed

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Articles found on remote island possibly belonged to Amelia Earhart (news.blogs.cnn.com) Mais...

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skuttlerats
Jeffrey Babey 4
After years of speculation I thought this really was a good story. The plane or parts of it have never been recovered so in my mind I think the mystery continues....
Av8nut
Michael Fuquay 4
Lots of holes in this story. Seems doubtful.
dbrooks84
David Brooks 3
Back about 15 years ago, I worked on Amelia Earhart case. Studying the 16mm movie film of her take off.

There have been all sorts theories put forth - none proven. I find it hard to believe that 57 "credible" radio intercepts were simply "swepted under the rug.” I stopped following the intrigues years ago.
runway18escanaba
runway18escanaba 2
very interesting

TWA55
TWA55 2
Hog wash.....
petept26
Pete Crawford 1
It seems like not a month goes without this TIGHAR group making some fantastic announcement about Amelia Earhart. Then of course you never hear any follow-up announcements when then their theory turns out to be nothing. All this based on a freckle cream jar? I think they make these premature announcements to raise money, which if you read their website seems to be what they are all about.
Zaffy
Zaffy 1
Wasnt she taken by the Japanese ? Why all this research now? And what good will this do? People ding research on this, should do so on oath. We have heard lots of crap before.
Zaffy
Zaffy 1
If the plane was standing on its wheels, this will suggest that it landed on some smooth surface. And not near some reef, over which it suddenly vanished. Was there a tsunami ?
smoki
smoki 1
57 "credible" radio transmissions from Earheart's plane after safely landing on the beach of an uninhabited island? Okay, but by what means were they judged to be credible? If judged to be credible, were they answered? Pam Am Clipper flights on their big luxurious float planes had been criss crossing the Pacific region since 1936, watching for and reporting on Jap naval movements and island buildups. It's possible they heard Earheart's transmissions.

I would think that if the safe beach landing by Earheart was indeed a valid scenario she and/or Noonan would have been searching for a frequency with audible/intelligible transmissions and would have been talking on that one which could have been a Clipper flight. Whether their beached plane was washed out to sea right away by the tide or not, the radio could only have been used as long as there was gas in the tanks to run an engine and a generator to power the radio. There probably wasn't much of that left after they had wandered around lost finally landing just before the tanks ran dry. They may have circled insight of an island for a while using their altitude in hopes of raising someone on the radio.

As soon as the plane was swamped by the tide that would have ended use of the radio making it essential to make all those "credible transmissions" probably on that first fateful day of their arrival. Because news traveled slowly back then those transmissions would not necessarily have been "recognized" as calls from Earheart until well after the fact. I seem to recall radio operators in those days also used morse code for sending out messages? When you think about it how much difference would it have made if they had been able to carry on a radio conversation with someone if they had no earthly idea of their position or did Noonan, the navigator, have use of a sextant?

While most of this doesn't quite pass the smell test, the one part of the story that does pass the smell test is the search plane overflying the small island where Earheart and/or Noonan may have tried frantically to get the attention of the crew only to go unseen with the search plane continuing on course never to return. That of course assumes that Earheart and Noonan were there with enough strength to signal their presence. This like all unsolved mysteries involving people of renown will for a long time be the source of wild speculation like that still surrounding D.B. Cooper (aka Dan Cooper) and the only successful act of air piracy to date (1971) with his parachute jump from the air stairs of a NWA 727 in the dark of night in driving rain while dressed in street clothes.
jpn12
James Newmark 1
Just another in the long line of "fishy" stories from TIGHAR, in an effort to keep the cash coming in. At this point, the mystery is simply, "where is the plan?".
yellowseven
Paul Simpson 1
Intriguing theory.
thewhitegroup
Stephan White 0
I wonder where these "57" transmissions have been hiding all these years; and just what information do they contain? Impossible to make any judgment until more is revealed. This is a "teaser" story designed to keep people "tuned-in" as the news channels do.

On Google Earth, I have contemplated where I would put down if forced to do so on Nikumaroro. The wind direction and tide are known (but not to me!) so one could determine the feasibility of a beach landing and where. I have also considered the possibility of a water-landing in the lagoon with a run-up onto shore at the last moment. Possible but not probable as this technique was not well known then.

At tide level, all steel and aluminum will be gone but there maybe some brass/bronze and stainless steel remnants that super-duper metal detectors might uncover. With that find, maybe some rubber remnants that could be identified also.
skuttlerats
Jeffrey Babey 0
(Duplicate Squawk Submitted)

Credible Amelia Earhart radio signals were ignored as bogus

New study says aviator's plane was on land, upright for several days after disappearance

Dozens of previously dismissed radio signals were actually credible transmissions from Amelia Earhart, according to a new study of the alleged post-loss signals from Earhart's plane. The transmissions started riding the air waves just hours after Earhart sent her last in-flight message.

The study, presented on Friday at a three day conference by researchers of The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR), sheds new light on what may have happened to the legendary aviator 75 years ago. The researchers plan to start a high-tech underwater search for pieces of her aircraft next July.


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/47653021/ns/technology_and_science-science/

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